The Beauty of San Francisco

Big and Small just want to share some photos of various attractions and fun in San Francisco. Click on each individual photo for more info. Please comment and enjoy our photos!

 

Customized Itineraries For Your Next Trip To San Francisco

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Making your way to the City by the Bay? Big & Small Travel has teamed up with Joyage to offer customized itineraries of San Francisco. We can help you Eat & Walk Your Way Through the City to catch both must-see attractions and hidden gems. We can lead you to some of the best spots to eat, walk, and explore, from the Mission’s best burrito to the finest handmade chocolate, from sweeping coastal vistas to the most scenic (and least touristy) summits.

Sign up HERE, and let us do the rest!

Happy Travels!
Big & Small

Black Sand Beach in Northern California & More

We visited an overlooked Black Sands Beach in Northern California. Black Sands Beach is in the south end of a long walkable coastline that is over 20 miles long in Shelter Cove along the Lost Coast Trail. Check out our Youtube Page and watch our Videos in Northern California.

 

Why is the sand so dark here? You’ll find black sand beaches in three types of regions: in areas with high wave energy, those next to volcanoes, and places where the source rock is primarily dark-colored and lacking in silica. In this part of California, the black get the color from dark colored sandstone and shale produced by tectonic activity of one continental and two oceanic plates meeting just offshore.

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We unearthed and found a video from our long European trek of Lisbon, Portugal. Watch us discuss the trams, graffiti, and culture of Lisbon —- the rawest capital of Western Europe.

We have updated our post San Francisco’s 8 Best Running Trails  Check it out!

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Updated Best Coffee Spots in San Francisco Bay Area

Summer is almost upon us, so what a better way to get energized and excited than discussing —- Coffee in the San Francisco Bay area. We have updated our San Francisco post on the best coffee roasters. Here is the new updated link Coffee: The New San Francisco Treat

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The Rich Beauty, Food, and History of Corsica, France

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This mountainous isle is a land of many contrasts. Corsica is full of natural beauty and incredible food, but it comes with quite a turbulent history. It’s home to Napoleon Bonaparte and (arguably) Christopher Columbus, two dominant figures whose widespread influence is still being felt around the world today. Despite this, present-day Corsica is a fairly sleepy island packed with fascinating historical attractions and driven by an independent spirit. Here, I’ll be featuring some of the beauty of this island in pictures, and best yet watch The Big and Small Travel Corsica Video below:

In the video above, we showcase the Citadel, beaches, historic sites, food, L’Île-Rousse, and even yoga from Handstand Steph. This is a wonderful way to enjoy the intimacy and splendor of the isle of fierce beauty.

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J-Crew overlooking the Ligurian Sea in Calvi.

The first thing we noticed on our trip to Corsica was the ubiquitous presence of the Corsican flag. The flag is bold and striking, and revealing in its black-and-white simplicity. Against a white backdrop, it depicts a Moor’s head in black with a white bandana above his eyes—a symbol of liberation, even though Corsica has mostly been under Italian or French rule.

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The Wild Boar of Corsica & the striking Corsican Flag.

This flag was everywhere, reminding us constantly of Corsica‘s strong independent spirit, which can be traced back through an interesting and significant history that includes connections to both Napoleon and Columbus. When in Calvi, I recommend exploring the citadel, which is open to the public and free to roam. It is filled with lots of small passageways, breathtaking lookouts, and interesting architecture. You’ll also notice a monument to Columbus, as well as churches and historical points that refer to the island’s existence under Genoese rule.

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Calvi Citadel – Palace of the Genovese, and reputed birthplace of Columbus. Hmm …

We present many visuals to document the citadel in Calvi, as well as the beauty and attractions at L’Île-Rousse (Red Island), named because of the color of the rocky islet that serves as a natural harbor.

You can get to L’Île-Rousse by train (which offers incredible views of the coast along the way). We recommend hiking up to the top of this part of L’Île-Rousse (just behind the train station) for great views of the Genoese tower and the vivid hills of Balagne in the background. This hike is short but intense and full of nooks and crannies that allow for great photo opps of the sea and beyond.

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Handstand Steph caught on camera at the red rocks of L’Ile-Rouse.

Overall, the food (especially the cheese and wild boar), wine, and striking landscapes are enough to make anyone swoon. But what most struck me most about Corsica was the relaxed sense of efficiency and an overall dedication to self-sufficiency. Corsica seemed to be running on its own watch, despite being part of France.  This made it feel like its own special little paradise.

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La Pietra Lighthouse in L’Ile Rouse, Corsica.
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Plage La Pinede (Calvi Beach) in Corsica.

 

Mount Bachelor in Oregon and Rural Northern California

Big and Small Travel are on Youtube! We post travel videos showcasing recent trips and excursions. Our most recent videos from 2016 include Mount Bachelor near Bend, Oregon where Big and Small go snowshoeing for the first time! Check it out below:

We enjoy the urban slides of San Francisco, California at Seward Street. Watch Handstand Steph fly and fall on these fast slides below:

Lastly, J-Crew got a chance to explore Northern California in an area near called Brownsville-Challenge, California. Check it out below:

72 Hours in Budapest, Hungary

72 Hours in Budapest
Ruin Pubs, Thermal Baths, the House of Terror, and the World’s First Rock Star

*DOWNLOAD A FREE 16-PAGE PDF OF THIS 3-DAY ITINERARY!*

This is a city that shines brilliantly through the darkness. It especially shimmers at night, with golden rays of light bouncing off the opulent palace in Buda and the commanding Parliament in Pest, setting the Danube River ablaze. The iconic Szechenyi Chain Bridge is in the center of it all, a symbol of both the union between Buda and Pest (the two cities were unified in 1873) and of the Hungarians’ determined resiliency (the bridge was rebuilt and reopened just four years after being destroyed in World War II).

But it’s not just this physical radiance that gives Budapest its distinctive glow. This is a city that doesn’t hide from its harrowing history; instead, it shines a big spotlight on it. And it’s a history so recent you can step right into its still smoldering remains, from the aptly named House of Terror to the many inventive ruin pubs dominating the nightlife. Everywhere you walk, there are constant reminders of a not-so-distant past, when the city lay in turmoil, and a secret police tormented citizens and tortured and killed any suspected anti-communist dissident.

Budapest Highlights

Yet for every commemorative statue, museum, and remembrance plaque, there’s now a hip new club, a hot new restaurant (paleo and vegan options abound), or a chic new boutique quickly transforming Budapest into a city for the young, the vibrant, and the hopeful. It’s a fascinating juxtaposition, between a dark history and a luminous present, and it makes for a visit that is chock full of history, music, food, drinks, thermal waters, and riverfront strolls.

Here’s a loose itinerary for three action-packed days in the gorgeous capital of Hungary.


 

DAY 1: Heroes, Horrors, and The World’s First Rock Star

Andrassy Avenue, Franz Liszt, Sziget Eye
Andrassy Avenue, Franz Liszt, Sziget Eye
  • Pop into the New York Café… then get your coffee across the street

The New York Café is a richly ornate spot built in Italian Renaissance style in 1894. It once served as a popular meeting place for the literary crowd; it’s now a tourist hotspot for cake and espresso, and the prices match the demand. We recommend taking a look around, then heading across the street to the more modern café, Hirado Kavezo, which serves a heartwarming cappuccino for half the price.

Heroes' Square: Celebrating 1,000 Years
Heroes’ Square: Celebrating 1,000 Years
  • Walk or take the metro to Heroes’ Square at the end of Andrassy Avenue

Surrounded by the Museum of Fine Arts and the Palace of Art, Heroes Square’ is a spacious public area next to City Park (Varosliget). At the center is the grand Millennium Monument, featuring a colonnade with statues symbolizing War, Peace, Work and Welfare, and Knowledge and Glory. See Big explain more, straight from the square:

It may sound like a kitschy Halloween attraction, but the     House of Terror is the real, terrifying deal. Previously the headquarters of the Nazi secret police, then Hungary’s communist secret police, this building holds the ghosts of countless atrocities. Several informative and interactive exhibits take you through the years and the lives of Hungarians under the Soviet regime, but it’s after entering an elevator that slowly leads you to the building’s innards that the terror truly sinks in. When the door opens, you’re led directly into the heart of the terror, including a water torture chamber, a tiny cell for solitary confinement, and an execution room fit with a noose—ominously swaying, of course. You’ll never quite be the same after visiting—and that’s exactly the point.

The Terror House
The Terror House

Step into the home of the world’s first rock star. This is where influential Hungarian composer Franz Liszt lived. It’s a small museum, but a fascinating one, too, with photographs, memorabilia, and (of course) Liszt’s pianos, and you’ll learn about his travels, his performances, and his ability to make women faint from admiration—Listzomania, indeed! If you’re not a fan of classical music, this may just change that. (Note: Beware of a (kind of) steep photography fee.)

Liszt Ferenc Museum
Liszt Ferenc Museum

Say hello to the Liszt statue awaiting you out front, then pop inside to take in the beautifully ornate architecture, the Greek fresco, and a sparkling bronze chandelier. For more of this type of design and architecture, head to the Alexandra Bookstore and its second-floor Book Café. 

Strolling Down Andrassy
Strolling Down Andrassy
  • Walk to the end of Andrassy Avenue and take a right toward St. Stephen’s Basilica 

Here’s another spot to see classical music (particularly involving organ), or to just gawk at more opulent neo-classical architecture.

Sziget Eye and a view of St. Stephen's Basilica from the top
Sziget Eye and a view of St. Stephen’s Basilica from the top
  • Walk back down Bajcsy-Zsilinszky to Erzsebet Square and take a ride on the Sziget Eye

Make sure to do this in the evening, when Budapest shines in all directions (you can’t miss it—it’s that sparkling sphere hypnotizing you from all over town). The price is a bit hefty, but the 10-minute ride is romantic and intimate, giving you incredible 360 views of one of Europe’s most beautiful cities. (Note: As of this writing, the Sziget Eye is closed between January 3 and April 15.)


 

DAY 2: Buda’s Castle District and a Tranquil Riverside Stroll

Széchenyi Chain Bridge, Buda Castle, Parliament, & Buda Viewpoint
Széchenyi Chain Bridge, Buda Castle, Parliament, & Buda Viewpoint
  • If you’re staying in Pest (recommended), today, you’ll cross the Szechenyi Chain Bridge

This may be one of Budapest’s most iconic symbols, a stately suspension bridge connecting Buda and Pest. Don’t miss the bridge’s guards: formidable stone lions which even survived WWII.

Breathtaking view from Castle Hill in Buda
Breathtaking view from Castle Hill in Buda
  • Stepping onto the Buda side, make your way up to Castle Hill

There are two main ways to climb the 170 meters to this UNESCO World Heritage site: From Adam Clark Square, hop onto the Sikló, a funicular railway originally built in 1870 (it was also destroyed in WWII), or simply walk up the Kiraly lipsco or “Royal Steps” (it’s not too bad of an ascent, we promise).

Buda Castle
Buda Castle
  • Explore Budapest’s Old Town and the Buda Castle/Royal Palace

This World Heritage Site was home to both royalty (since the 13th century) and destruction. The Royal Palace was destroyed after being controlled by the Turks, rebuilt by the Habsburgs, and then ruined again in WWII. The Palace now houses the Budapest History Museum, the Hungarian National Gallery, and the Hungarian National Library. In general, it’s a beautiful area to walk around and enjoy spectacular views of both Buda and Pest.

Mathias Church & Fisherman's Bastion
Mathias Church & Fisherman’s Bastion
  • Head over to Trinity Square to visit Mathias Church and the Fishermen’s Bastion

The Neo-Gothic style Mathias Church, with its diamond-patterned tiles, is one of Buda’s most resplendent attractions. (Fascinating fact: It was actually turned into a mosque during the Turkish occupation.) It can be seen from many different angles throughout the city, while the nearby Fishermen’s Bastion towers majestically over the Danube, offering one of Budapest’s best (and most popular) viewpoints.

  • Walk or take the tram across the Danube, via Margaret Bridge, to start your Riverfront Walk in Pest, with a quick stop at the House of Parliament (Tip: Best done after sundown!)

If you have time (we didn’t, but wish we did!), make a stop at Margaret Island, a leafy and popular recreation area in the middle of the Danube. Then, make it back to the riverfront in Pest and take a leisurely stroll toward your starting point, the Chain Bridge. We highly recommend this to be an evening activity. As mentioned in my intro, this city is one of Europe’s most beautiful—particularly at night, with Buda and Pest’s golden lights colliding and reflecting off the river. Along the way, spot the Olympic rings, take a tour around the stately Neo-Gothic House of Parliament, and check out nearby memorials to learn more about the 1956 Hungarian Revolution.

Protest in front of the Parliament
Protest in front of the Parliament

DAY 3: Enjoy a Bath and Party at a Ruin Pub (or Two)

Szechenyi Thermal Baths, City Park, Szimpla Kert Ruin Pub
Szechenyi Thermal Baths, City Park, Szimpla Kert Ruin Pub

Yes, you were near here on Day 1, at Heroes’ Square. Now, venture inward and check out sites like the Time Wheel (essentially a giant hourglass—or “year”-glass to be more accurate), the Budapest Zoo and Botanical Garden, and the Vajdahunyad Castle, situated along the lake.

The Vajdahunyad Castle in City Park was built in 1896 as part of the Millennial Exhibition to celebrate Hungary's 1,000th year.
The Vajdahunyad Castle in City Park was built in 1896 as part of the Millennial Exhibition to celebrate Hungary’s 1,000th year.

Bust out the bathing suit and dip into the healing waters of one of the biggest bath complexes in Europe. There are several other baths to visit in Budapest—of varying sizes, prices, and cleanliness—so it’s definitely worth researching more if you’d like a more traditional (or cheaper) experience. This one in particular has 18 indoor and outdoor pools, steam rooms, saunas, and massage and other wellness treatments. We stuck to the outdoor pools, and particularly enjoyed jumping into the whirlpool, which spins you around with water jets—seriously some of the best time you’ll have with strangers in swimsuits. You could easily spend all day here exploring the complex and simply soaking—you may need it after all that walking from Days 1 & 2. You can keep your belongings in lockers secured with your own wristband (similar to the Blue Lagoon).

One of three outdoor pools at Szechenyi Thermal Baths
One of three outdoor pools at Szechenyi Thermal Baths
  • Take the metro and head over to the Seventh District (the old Jewish Quarter) for eats and drinks

This area is home to the Jewish quarter, and the Great Synagogue (the second largest in the world). It’s also the hottest spot in Budapest, with its thriving cultural and culinary scene. There’s an eclectic mix of restaurants—where you can get some of Europe’s finest cheap eats, from hummus to goulash—as well as interactive entertainment in the form of escape rooms (in which you actually pay to get locked into a cell?!).

Szimpla Kert Ruin Pub
Szimpla Kert Ruin Pub
  • Go ruin pub-hopping

Do not miss out on one of the area’s famous “ruin pubs,” large, funky, often multi-room bars built in the area’s abandoned buildings. It’s like jumping into a surreal bazaar, with odd antiques glued to the wall, flea-market furniture and empty bathtubs strewn about, creepy toys and teddy bears mingling on tables, and other sundry pieces of trashy art and zany treasures. Reasonably priced alcohol and an eccentric mix of live bands and DJs round out the ruin pub experience. We recommend getting lost in Szimpla Kert, one of the first and largest ruin pubs in Budapest, where you can even throw back a beer in an old Trabant (an East German-made car).

Now, book that trip and enjoy your time in Budapest! We sure did.
~Big & Small

I’m Afraid of the Internet: The Death of Bowie and Content as We Know It

Posing at the Berlin Wall
Posing at the Berlin Wall. Berlin inspired some of David Bowie’s most creative and productive years.

This post was originally meant to be a rumination on post-travel blues, but it has turned into something else entirely as I come to terms with settling in back home and working out my next big life step…

I’ve spent all of 2016 clicking on an endless amount of content telling me what to eat, what to do, what to be, what not to be, how to be, who to be, who I should be, who I think I am, who the enemy is, who the real enemy is, what I should care about, why I should care about it. My brain is on the fritz and I’m no more knowledgeable because of it. In fact, I’m more disillusioned, disgusted, and terrified, and I’ve had no idea how to articulate that, which makes me click on even more content to see if someone else can.

After traveling for two months, soaking up food, culture, history, different ways of seeing and believing in the big three — life, love, and death — I’ve taken to sitting on my laptop trying to find something to motivate me — to move me, because I’m not physically moving anymore. I’m filled to the brim with information and misinformation, and it’s gotten me nothing but a sore butt.

The Man Who Sold the World

This has been the ghastly state of my brain lately. And then David Bowie died. And I had received the news just as I had pressed play on “Blackstar” for at least the 100th time. I can’t even explain why this track had been haunting me so much (at least, I couldn’t before his death), other than that it is beautiful, mystical, and totally terrifying — like the most powerful images we come across on this planet. It’s Bowie pushing his toes to the edge of a cliff, scanning the endless sea below, and then diving, gleefully, into the infinite.

And the more I’ve dug into Bowie, the more I’ve fully realized what it is about him that has hit me (all of us) so hard. He represents everything this world quickly tries to beat out of us: freakiness, curiosity, rebellion. He played the system while subverting it at the same time. He even saw the internet (back in 1999, mind you) as carrying “the flag of being subversive and possibly rebellious and chaotic, nihilistic.”

So I keep thinking about this idea as I mill about online. But I’m struggling with this notion, too, because I fear the internet, as the majority of us know it and embrace it, has gone the same way as rock ’n’ roll — watered down for mass consumption. The rebels, the renegades, the nonconformists, they struggle and thrive on the fringes like they always have. They may get a bigger audience now, but only in the span of a day’s meme.

I’m Afraid of the Internet, I’m Afraid of the World

Maybe it’s because the data dutifully places us with our quantifiable doppelgangers, so we’re all placed into some little fragmented digital bubble where we all mostly, seemingly share similar ideas and experiences. The internet has turned from a heated melting pot to a cold, stagnant stew, as we all float with our likeminded kind. So, when Trump or Obama or Muslims or Christians or anti-vaxxers or vegans or anyone with any sort of nebulous label threaten our little bubbles’ beliefs, we can shout at each other, share the same (mis)information with each other, and count up the likes for validation — and not learn anything in the process.

It’s easy to blame the technology, and not just ourselves. We underestimate how easily we as humans can adapt to external stimuli, even though we’re all still run by chemicals and an ego. We still form allies and enemies, heroes and villains, just now behind screens and with the illusion that it’s all based on questionable data, statistics, and science. We forget that the internet is zeroes and ones, black and white; it’s just information organized. There’s no room for the grey of reality, for true chaos, for tangible experience. The internet is not the cause of the world’s countless schisms, but it is the messenger — and we’re all getting some part of the message, curated just for us.

So when reality bursts our bubble — when a city is attacked, when women are raped, when children are killed, when the day’s mass shooting trends — we don’t know how to cope, to relate, to comprehend, to understand each other. We become afraid of others, afraid of ourselves, afraid to leave our safe little online world where we can escape to pictures of sloths and old Bowie videos.

Under Pressure

And here’s where my current dilemma lies. My job is to write and edit content for this big, global messenger, and I’m finding it harder and harder to do just that — to write even this feels like an exercise in futility. To add to the deafening noise feels dishonest and unproductive. So, I’ve felt shiftless, and lazy, and a little scared. How do I reconcile that? How do I make a living? What would Bowie do?!

Well, he would shock the hell out of us — in a time when we can’t possibly be shocked anymore. He resurrected the ideals of rock ’n’ roll, of the internet — to subvert, challenge, and inspire — with his own departure. He made us question our own morality; he made death — the scariest thing of all — just as thrilling as life.

This going-away present has wormed its way into our collective guts. I feel it in my own, wriggling around, lighting up neurons, electrifying my brain, making me feel weird and uneasy but strangely inspired, as the best art should. It isn’t telling me what to eat, what to do, what to be, what not to be, how to be, who to be, who I should be, who I think I am, who the enemy is, who the real enemy is, what I should care about, why I should care about it. And maybe that’s all I — we — need.

Exploring North Beach and San Francisco’s Top Trails

Happy 2016 from Big and Small Travel!

J-Crew and Handstand Steph are back from a big European vacation with an update from their home base of San Francisco. First, we take you on a tour through the coastal city’s many scenic and hilly trails that offer both incredible views and butt-kicking workouts. Check out our picks for San Francisco’s Top 8 Running Trails here!

Then, we head over to North Beach with a brand new video showcasing one of our favorite corners of this historic San Francisco hood, where we like to go for good coffee and macarons:

Handstand Steph talks about a legendary place for sandwiches in North Beach:

Stay tuned for more from Big and Small Travel and be sure to follow us on Twitter and Instagram for more updates.

 

Top 6 Iceland Attractions

Jökulsárlón, Big and Small Travel at the edge of the glacial lagoon off the Ring Road.
Jökulsárlón, Big and Small Travel at the edge of the glacial lagoon off the Ring Road.

Whether or not you’re facing the woozy effects of jetlag, landing in Iceland still feels like landing in another world—the raw beauty is simply stunning. This is an island of active volcanoes, glacial lagoons, intense rainbows, resplendent fog, towering mountains, and… perhaps even a troll or two. This was the first stop for my wife and I during our two-month honeymoon and it remains a highlight—every place else seems second-rate in comparison; its unblemished beauty is unmatched.

Iceland is an underpopulated island in an overpopulated world. Here, nature is truly king. And as of late 2015, almost every natural attraction in the country is free of charge. There is rumor, however, that the government may start implementing entrance fees, so I recommend making the trip there soon. When you do, here are six must-see sites to hit. Most of these attractions are along the Golden Circle, a popular tourist route from Reykjavik, except for my #1 recommended spot, Jökulsárlón, a place well-worth the extra mileage.

1. Jökulsárlón

Jökulsárlón glacial lagoon is actually one of the younger sites on the island; it’s only about 80 years old. The glacial lagoon (or Jökulsárlón in Icelandic) started to form in the early 20th century due to warming temperatures. A lake developed after the glacier started receding from the Atlantic Ocean. The lake continues to grow as the glaciers melt, creating quite a breathtaking phenomenon. The icebergs glimmer and exude a powder-blue color, unmistakable even from the warmth of your car. It almost feels fake, like a movie set made of fantastical ice. In fact, Jökulsárlón has been the backdrop for a few films, including Batman Begins and Die Another Day. I recommend avoiding the lagoon boat tours and just wandering along the shore. It is possible to escape the crowds and find a spot to gaze at the beauty of the lagoon. You’ll want to stare at this thing for a while, trust me. I was lucky enough to get up and touch the ice and even partially stand on some of it, before it eventually floats away and melts into the sea.

2. Vik’s Black Sand Beach

The black sand beach of Vik is possibly one of the 10 most beautiful, non-tropical beaches on Earth. Both sides of the beach are accessible by car, either from downtown Vik or near Reynisdrangar. The long stretch of volcanic beach is enhanced by a cliff side that resembles a giant church organ. Meanwhile, the large rock formations protruding out of the sea at Reynisdrangar are shrouded in troll legends and Icelandic myths. In the summer months, you may even be able to spot some puffins here. Unfortunately, we just missed them, as they migrated back to life on the sea two weeks before our arrival. The area of Vik in general has an eerie sort of mystique to it, as it lies in the shadows of the Mýrdalsjökull glacier and Katla, an active volcano that could erupt at any moment.

3. Gullfoss

This is a waterfall that makes Niagara seem like a fake Disney attraction. Gulfoss, meaning “Golden Falls,” is spectacular and massive. Here, you will be dazzled by a vivid rainbow (or two) on sunny days, as the mist creates a wall of drizzle. The waterfall has been a national attraction since 1875 and was almost lost to foreign investors, who wanted to use it for electricity. But because of lack of funds, it remains an unblemished spectacle.

4. Geysir

Geysir is the gusher (as it literally means in Icelandic) in which all other geysers are named. Just east of Reykjavik and very close to Gulfoss, this is another one of the hot spots along the Golden Circle. On average, you will only have to wait about 5-10 minutes for the Strokkur geysir to shoot water up to about 98 feet in the air. We hung around the area and watched it spurt at least 5-7 times—it doesn’t get old. This is a cool area to wander around and see all the geothermal activity bubbling at your toes.

Blue Lagoon, located in a lava field in Grindavík on the Reykjanes Peninsula, southwestern Iceland.
Blue Lagoon, located in a lava field in Grindavík on the Reykjanes Peninsula, southwestern Iceland.

5. Blue Lagoon

Located relatively close to Keflavik Airport, the main Reykjavik hub, the Blue Lagoon is considered one of the 25 wonders of the world. The lava field around the Blue Lagoon (which reminded us a bit of Craters of the Moon in Idaho) is created from the geothermic craters of Eldvorp, which provides water for the lagoon. The Blue Lagoon is a mostly natural attraction, built up to accommodate large groups, with a swim-up bar and other modern conveniences.

The average water temperature is around 100 degrees Fahrenheit, and suitable even on a blustery day. Some of the simpler pleasures came from roaming around the vast lagoon and finding various hot spots. There’s also an area to scoop out some silica-based mud to rub on your face for a quick spa treatment. The small waterfall, tucked in the corner of the lagoon, is a real sweet surprise—duck underneath it to get a powerful water-driven shoulder and back massage. I recommend getting there right when the Lagoon opens. The crowds start to stream in around 10-11am.

Reykjadalur Hike, located roughly 35 miles from Reykjavik, the area of Reykjadalur (meaning "hot river") .
Reykjadalur Hike, located roughly 35 miles from Reykjavik, the area of Reykjadalur (meaning “hot river”) .

6. Reykjadalur Hike

Located roughly 35 miles from Reykjavik, the area of Reykjadalur (meaning “hot river”) is perfect for a moderate-level hike, which ends at a natural hot spring (which is free!). This hike feels like classic Iceland, you’ll come across beautiful vistas, walk through patches of fog, and even see the earth bubbling at your feet. It takes about an hour to get to the spot set aside for soaking in the hot spring, but it is definitely worth it. Hopefully, you’ll have better weather than we did—we got stuck in a storm in the middle of the hike and came back completely drenched! Be prepared to get wet and muddy—bring good shoes, a swimsuit, and a towel.

As of Fall/Winter 2015, all of these natural attractions (except for the Blue Lagoon) were free of charge. There is rumor, however, that the government may start implementing entrance fees, so I recommend making the trip there soon. Bon voyage and happy travels!

Check out the wonderful Ever in Transit travel blog for more pictures from these Top 6 Iceland attractions listed above too.